Friday, March 31, 2017

Simple Car hack ideas you can use.Watch



credit/source: facebook.com and BRIGHT SIDE

Note: Do not use cellphone /text while driving. 

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Seohyun GIF attends Seoul Fashion Week



credit/source: http://imgur.com/i8o26Nm?third_party=1 and twitter.com/theFlyers_ and Seohyun of SNSD. Later if I could find the name of the original video upload owner I will acknowledge him/her. GIRLS' GENERATION Seohyun and Seoul Fashion Week 2017.

Finally, I found the original editor of this video/GIF, I would to thank @theFlyers

Saturday, March 25, 2017

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Llittle boy makeshift train to stroll all his Pugs


credit/source: facebook.com and The lad Bible Here are some comments for this video: 1.When you're going out for a road trip with your mates and you have to squeeze yourself into the boot while they all sit together and pass joints. 2. I feel so sorry for the little dude at the end. 3. Tell me that's not the cutest thing you've ever seen.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Bodies of Water (and Related Words) Vocabulary Word List

Bodies of Water (and Related Words) Vocabulary Word List

A
alluvial fan
arm of the sea
arroyo

B
basin
bay
bayou
bend
bight
billibong
bog
brook

C
canal
cataract
channel
coral reef
cove
crater lake
creek

D
dam
delta

E
estuary

F
falls
fen
firth
fjord
fork

G
geyser
glacier
glacier cave
gulch
gulf
gully

H
harbor
headland
headwaters

I
iceberg
ice cliff
ice field
inlet
island
islet

K
kettle
kill

L
lagoon
lake
loch

M
mangrove swamp
marsh
meander
mid-ocean ridge
millpond
moat
mouth
mud flat

N
narrows
neck

O
oasis
ocean
oceanic trench
oxbow lake

P
playa
pond
pool
port
prairie
puddle

R
rapids
reef
reservoir
ria
river
riverbed
river delta
rivulet
run

S
salt marsh
scarp
scree
sea
sea cave
seashore
shallows
shoal
shore
shoreline
slough
sound
source
spring
strait
stream
subglacial lake
surf
swamp

T
tidal basin
tide pool
tributary

W
wash
waterfall
watershed
waterway
wetland

Credit/Source: Http://Www.Enchantedlearning.Com/Wordlist/Bodiesofwater.Shtml


Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Watersheds! What's the meaning of this and how it works



credit/source: youtube.com and  CoCoRaHS HQ and Colorado State University


water.usgs.gov





















When looking at the location of rivers and the amount of stream-flow in rivers, the key concept 
is the river's "watershed". What is a watershed? Easy, if you are standing on ground right now, 
just look down. You're standing, and everyone is standing, in a watershed.                                                                                                                     A watershed is the area of land where all of the water that falls in it and drains off of it goes to                                                                                                                 a common outlet. Watersheds can be as small as a footprint or large enough to encompass all 
the land that drains water into rivers that drain into Chesapeake Bay, where it enters 
the Atlantic Ocean. This map shows one set of watershed boundaries in the continental
 United States; these are known as National 8-digit hydro-logic units (watersheds).
A watershed is an area of land that drains all the streams and rainfall to a common outlet such
 as the outflow of a reservoir, mouth of a bay, or any point along a stream channel. 
The word watershed is sometimes used interchangeably with drainage basin or catchment. 
Ridges and hills that separate two watersheds are called the drainage divide. The watershed 
consists of surface water--lakes, streams, reservoirs, and wetlands--and all the underlying 
ground water.
 Larger watersheds contain many smaller watersheds. It all depends on the outflow point; 
all of the land that drains water to the outflow point is the watershed for that outflow location. 
Watersheds are important because the stream-flow and the water quality of a river are affected
 by things, human-induced or not, happening in the land area "above" the river-outflow point.

A watershed is a precipitation collector

Map of the northeastern United States showing an outline of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which drains into the Atlantic Ocean.
water.usgs.gov



















Most of the precipitation that falls within the drainage area of a stream's monitoring site
 collects in the stream and eventually flows by the monitoring site. Many factors, some listed
 below, determine how much of the streamflow will flow by the monitoring site. Imagine that
 the whole basin is covered with a big (and strong) plastic sheet. Then if it rained one inch,
 all of that rain would fall on the plastic, run downslope into gulleys and small creeks and then
 drain into main stream. Ignoring evaporation and any other losses, and using
 a 1-square mile example watershed, then all of the approximately 17,378,560 gallons of water 
that fell (you can use our 
as rainfall would eventually flow by the watershed-outflow point.

Not all precipitation that falls in a watershed flows out


To picture a watershed as a plastic-covered area of land that collects precipitation is overly
 simplistic and not at all like a real-world watershed. A career could be built on trying to model 
a watershed water budget (correlating water coming into a watershed to water leaving 
a watershed). There are many factors that determine how much water flows in a stream
 (these factors are universal in nature and not particular to a single stream):                                                                                                                        Precipitation: The greatest factor controlling stream-flow, by far, is the amount of 
precipitation that falls in the watershed as rain or snow. However, not all precipitation                                                                                                                      
 that falls in a watershed flows out, and a stream will often continue to flow where there                                                                                                                  
  is no direct runoff from recent precipitation.

Infiltration: When rain falls on dry ground, some of the water soaks in, or infiltrates                                                                                                                                  the soil. Some water that infiltrates will remain in the shallow soil layer, where                                 
  it will gradually move downhill, through the soil, and eventually enters the stream by                                                                                                                         seepage into the stream bank. Some of the water may infiltrate much deeper,
 recharging groundwater aquifers. Water may travel long distances or remain in storage                                                                                                                    for long periods before returning to the surface. The amount of water that will soak in                                                                                                             overtime depends on several characteristics of the watershed as the following:
  • Soil characteristics: In Georgia, clayey and rocky soils of the northern areas                                                                                                                           absorb less water at a slower rate than sandy soils, such as in Georgia's Coastal                                                                                                                           Plain. Soils absorbing less water results in more runoff overland into streams.
  • Soil saturation: Like a wet sponge, soil already saturated from previous rainfall                                                                                                                                  can't absorb much more ... thus more rainfall will become surface runoff.
  • Land coverSome land covers have a great impact on infiltration and rainfall                                                                                                                             Impervious surfaces, such as parking lots, roads, and developments, act as                                                                                                                                      a "fast lane" for rainfall - right into storm drains that drain directly into streams.                                                                                           Flooding becomes more prevalent as the area of impervious surfaces increase.
  • Slope of the land: Water falling on steeply-sloped land runs off more quickly than                 
  • Evaporation: Water from rainfall returns to the atmosphere largely through evaporation.                                                                                                                 The amount of evaporation depends on temperature, solar radiation, wind, atmospheric                                        
  • Transpiration: The root systems of plants absorb water from the surrounding soil                                                                                            in various amounts. Most of this water moves through the plant and escapes into                                                                                                                             the atmosphere through the leaves. Transpiration is controlled by the same factors as                                                                                                                    evaporation, and by the characteristics and density of the vegetation. Vegetation slows                                                                                                                    runoff and allows water to seep into the ground.
  • Storage: Reservoirs store water and increase the amount of water that evaporates and                                                                                                        infiltrates, storage and release of water in reservoirs can have a significant effect on the                                                                                                                     stream-flow patterns of the river below the dam.
  • Water use by people: Uses of a stream might range from a few homeowners and                                                                                                                   businesses pumping small amounts of water to irrigate their lawns to large amounts of                                                                        water withdrawals for irrigation, industries, mining, and to supply populations with                                                                                                                           drinking water.                                                                                                                                                                                                        credit/source: https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watershed.html

What is a Watershed?

A watershed is an area of land that catches rain and snow and drains or 
seeps into a marsh, stream, river, lake or groundwater. Homes, farms,
 cottages, forests, small towns, big cities and more can make up watersheds.                                                                                                 
Some cross municipal, provincial and even international boarders. 
They come in all shapes and sizes and can vary from millions of acres,
like the land that drains into the Great lakes, to a few acres that drain into
a pond.
The interactive presentation shown below uses Adobe© FLASH PLAYER
credit/source: http://watershedatlas.org/fs_indexwater.html
All articles are credit to original writer/writers references including the images and 
youtube video.




Different Types of Water Bodies: Characteristics and example

Water bodies are areas of water, both salt and fresh, large and small, which are distinct from one another in various ways. The largest water bodies are oceans, while the smallest are brooks or streams. Smaller accumulations of water, such as puddles or swimming pools are not usually referred to as bodies of water in the geographical sense.

Ocean

credit: estivillml/iStock/Getty Images
Oceans are large water bodies, made up of salt water. The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean on earth, covering one-third of the earth’s surface. The Pacific Ocean is followed by the Atlantic Ocean and the Indian Ocean in size. Oceans are important for providing food, through the many fish species that populate the oceans, for air quality and for transport via ships.

Sea

credit:kaliostro/iStock/Getty Images
Seas are smaller bodies of water than oceans, but still large water bodies, partly enclosed by a land mass and connected to an ocean. The largest of the earth’s seas is the South China Sea, which holds hundreds of islands in its waters. The Caribbean Sea, Mediterranean Sea and the Bering Sea are some of the world’s largest

Different Types of Water Bodies w/picture

Lake

credit: Shaiith/iStock/Getty Images
A lake is a body of water completely encapsulated by land. When a lake is very large, it is sometimes called a sea, despite not being connected to an ocean, such as the Caspian Sea in central Asia. The Caspian Sea is the World’s largest lake, followed by Lake Superior in the US, Lake Victoria in Africa and Lake Aral in Russia . Lakes can be either salt or freshwater.

River

cerdit: blagov58/iStock/Getty Images
Rivers are large flowing water bodies that typically end in an ocean or sea. Rivers are freshwater bodies of water that usually originate in mountains or areas of high elevations, and are added to by smaller bodies of water such as creeks or streams, as well as by rainfall. Rivers are historically very important for trade and transportation, and many settlements were built alongside rivers for these reasons. Rivers also provide a source of energy generation. The world’s longest river is the Nile in Egypt, followed by the Amazon River in South America, and China’s Yangtze and Yellow Rivers.

Glaciers

credit: moodboard/moodboard/Getty Images
Glaciers are frozen rivers, which move very slowly. According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, glaciers store around 75 percent of the world’s freshwater, which means if they melt, sea levels would rise by up to 230 feet. Glaciers are ancient bodies of water, with some, such as the Arctic Ice Sheet being over 40 million years old.
credit/source: http://sciencing.com/different-types-water-bodies-6525786.html


Names for Water Bodies

Definitions of Lakes, Rivers, Seas, Oceans, Bays, Streams, and More

Water bodies are described by a plethora of different names in English - riversstreams, ponds, bays, gulfs, and seas to name a few Many of these terms' definitions overlap and thus become confusing when one attempts to pigeon-hole a type of water body. Read on to find out the similarities (and differences) between terms used to describe water bodies.
We'll begin with the different forms of flowing water.
The smallest water channels are often called brooks but creeks are often larger than brooks but may either be permanent or intermittent. Creeks are also sometimes known as streams but the word stream is quite a generic term for any body of flowing water. Streams can be intermittent or permanent and can be on the surface of the earth, underground, or even within an ocean (such as the Gulf Stream).
A river is a large stream that flows over land. It is often a perennial water body and usually flows in a specific channel, with a considerable volume of water. The world's shortest river, the D River, in Oregon, is only 120 feet long and connects Devil's Lake directly to the Pacific Ocean.
A pond is a small lake, most often in a natural depression. Like a stream, the word lake is quite a generic term - it refers to any accumulation of water surrounded by land - although it is often of a considerable size.
A very large lake that contains salt water is known as a sea (except the Sea of Galilee, which is actually a freshwater lake).
A sea can also be attached to, or even part of, an ocean. For example, the Caspian Sea is a large saline lake surrounded by land, the Mediterranean Sea is attached to the Atlantic Ocean, and the Sargasso Sea is a portion of the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by water.
Oceans are the ultimate bodies of water and refers to the five oceans - Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Indian, and Southern. The equator divides the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Oceans into the North and South Atlantic Ocean and the North and South Pacific Ocean.
Coves are the smallest indentations of land by a lake, sea, or ocean. A bay is larger than a cove and can refer to any wide indentation of the land. Larger than a bay is a gulf which is usually a deep cut of the land, such as the Persian Gulf or the Gulf of California. Bays and gulfs can also be known as inlets.
Any lake or pond directly connected to a larger body of water can be called a lagoon and a channel explains a narrow sea between two land masses, such as the English Channel.
credit/source: https://www.thoughtco.com/names-for-water-bodies-1435366


Types of Water Bodies


We all know how important water is to us. 3/4 of the earth’s surface is covered with water. This water is distributed throughout the planet in various forms and shapes, called the various water bodies. These water bodies differ in size, right from huge ones like oceans and seas to the small ones like ponds. Thus the various water bodies we see on the earth’s surface are in the form of oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, ponds, waterfalls etc.

Different Bodies of Water and their Characteristics

Let us travel the earth and learn about these various water bodies found only on our beautiful planet.

Oceans:

  • The oceans are vast and deep bodies of water. Usually, it is these oceans that separate continents from one another. The oceans are bodies of salt water.
  • We have five oceans in our world. They are the Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, Arctic Ocean, the Southern Ocean or Antarctic Ocean.
  • The largest and deepest ocean in the world is the Pacific ocean, covering one-third of the earth’s surface.
  • This is followed by the Atlantic ocean and the Indian ocean in order of size.
  • Oceans are home to a variety of plants and seaweed and thousands of sea creatures like the sea urchins, whales, sharks, octopus, a variety of fish, snakes, squids etc.
  • In fact, oceans also contain millions of tiny dead animals called coral polyps which form the beautiful coral reefs, Australia being the largest coral reef in the world.
  • Oceans are useful to us in many ways as they are a rich source of minerals, they provide energy and valuable fuels like petroleum.
  • They work as an important channel of transportation.

Seas:

  • Seas are also big water bodies but are definitely smaller than oceans. They are partly enclosed by a land mass and open into the ocean.
  • We see many seas eventually connecting to the oceans. For example we have the Mediterranean Sea which is attached or joins the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Some of the seas are the Red Sea, the Black Sea, the Arabian Sea, Caribbean Sea and the Mediterranean Sea.
  • The Red and the Black Sea, have got their names because the Red Sea has millions of red tiny plants growing at the bottom and the Black Sea because of the thick black mud that lies at its bottom.
  • Under the seas we find huge plains, high mountains and even deep valleys, interesting isn’t it, that these various landforms are also present under the sea.
  • The largest of the seas is the South China Sea which is supposed be holding hundreds of islands in its waters .
  • The sea, like the oceans is useful to us in many ways.It is a rich source of food providing us with various kinds of sea food.
  • It also works as a channel for transportation.
  • Like oceans, seas are a source of food, and are also usually used extensively as transport lanes for ships.

Lakes:

  • A lake is a water body surrounded by land on all sides. It is actually the opposite of an island, which is a piece of land surrounded by water on all sides.
  • Lakes can be salty or fresh water lakes. Salty lakes are due to a lot of evaporation taking place.
  • Some famous lakes are-Lake Superior, Caspian Sea, Lake Victoria, Lake Aral and the Dal Lake .
  • In fact the Caspian Sea is the world’s largest salt lake, it is so big that it is referred to as sea.
  • Lake Superior is the biggest fresh water lake.
  • The Dead Sea is a salt water lake.
  • It is said that nothing can survive in the Dead Sea because it is very salty.

Rivers:

  • Rivers are large streams that flow over the land. They are hence large flowing water bodies, they usually end up in an ocean or sea.
  • Rivers are fresh water bodies which generally originate in mountainous areas or elevated areas.
  • We have basically two kinds of rivers which are, the Snow-fed rivers and the second is the Rain-fed rivers.
  • Snow-fed rivers find their source in the snow capped mountains, where the snow melts, flowing down forming rivers, rain-fed rivers as the name suggests are formed in areas where it rains a lot giving rise to these rivers.
  • The place where a river starts its journey, is called the source and the place where it ends its journey , is called the mouth of a river.
  • Rivers again are very useful as we have seen in history,that most civilizations were formed near the banks of the rivers, like the Egyptian Civilization on the banks of the River Nile, the Indus Valley Civilization on the banks of the River Indus.
  • This is because the rivers deposit a lot of fertile soil called silt which is excellent for the growing of crops.

Gulf:

  • A gulf is a large area of an ocean or a sea that is partially enclosed by land.
For Example the Gulf of Mexico.

Bay:

  • A bay is a body of water, which is again partially enclosed by land. It is a wide mouth opening of land, where the water is surrounded by land on three sides and is joined to the sea on the fourth side.
For example the Bay of Bengal

Lagoon:

  • A lagoon is a lake separated from the open sea by sand or rocks.
  • Lake Chilika in Orissa, India is an example of a lagoon.

Strait:

  • A strait is a narrow stretch of water which joins two larger water bodies.
For example: Palk Strait joining the Bay of Bengal and the Indian Ocean.

Waterfall:

  • Water falling from a height is usually called a waterfall. A waterfall is formed when a river flows over an edge of hard rocks and falls from a great height.
  • Waterfalls make beautiful tourist spots and are helpful in generating hydroelectric power.
  • The Angel falls in South America are the world’s highest waterfall.
credit/source: http://mocomi.com/types-of-water-bodies/

Bodies of Water (and Related Words) Vocabulary Word List

A
alluvial fan
arm of the sea
arroyo

B
basin
bay
bayou
bend
bight
billibong
bog
brook

C
canal
cataract
channel
coral reef
cove
crater lake
creek

D
dam
delta

E
estuary

F
falls
fen
firth
fjord
fork

G
geyser
glacier
glacier cave
gulch
gulf
gully

H
harbor
headland
headwaters

I
iceberg
ice cliff
ice field
inlet
island
islet

K
kettle
kill

L
lagoon
lake
loch

M
mangrove swamp
marsh
meander
mid-ocean ridge
millpond
moat
mouth
mud flat

N
narrows
neck

O
oasis
ocean
oceanic trench
oxbow lake

P
playa
pond
pool
port
prairie
puddle

R
rapids
reef
reservoir
ria
river
riverbed
river delta
rivulet
run

S
salt marsh
scarp
scree
sea
sea cave
seashore
shallows
shoal
shore
shoreline
slough
sound
source
spring
strait
stream
subglacial lake
surf
swamp

T
tidal basin
tide pool
tributary

W
wash
waterfall
watershed
waterway
wetland

credit/source: Http://Www.Enchantedlearning.Com/Wordlist/Bodiesofwater.Shtml


World's Major Bodies Of Water

Important and/or Significant Bodies of Water List 

Including bays, canals, channels, falls, gulfs, lakes, oceans, rivers, seas and strait       Please click the link for complete below detail and meaning in alphabetical order;   credit/source: http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/lista.htm
Additional information:
Waterbody types
credit/source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_of_water

Note: All sources and references are credit to original writer/writers including the images featured.